Teton Valley

As soon as you walk in the door, you can tell that Farmhouse 208 is a passion project.

The north Driggs shop perfectly melds owner Kate Zupancic’s passion for horses, design, and homewares into a delightful mix of gifts, household essentials, and equestrian needs. “It’s like my brain exploded and turned into a shop!” says Kate, who owns Farmhouse 208 with her husband Frank.

The Zupancics are not new to the retail or horse world — the couple has owned WC Equestrian, a high-end equestrian shop in Las Vegas since 2007, and their pop-up equestrian shops have graced horse shows all over the West. With a deep love of the West and a desire to live a more outdoor lifestyle, the Zupancics and their two kids moved to the Teton Valley eight years ago. After commuting and managing the Vegas shop remotely, they opened Farmhouse 208 in October 2019.

The shop stocks serious equestrian equipment — tack, riding apparel, safety gear, and horse care products — which draws clients across the region who are looking for high-performance items. Kate explains that, “the shop caters to all riders and horses.”

In addition to the equestrian component of Farmhouse 208, the shop has a thoughtful and eclectic selection of gifts, that Kate, who has a background in design and a passion for home décor, curates herself. “I love creating an experience for the customer,” she explains. The shop has a modern-rustic aesthetic that’s comfortable and begs browsing. It’s here you’ll find Kate’s carefully curated selection of throw pillows, body products, candles, clothing, and gourmet food items, alongside equine- themed accessories. The shop’s biggest seller is “a delicious jalapeño jelly made by two women in Portland, Oregon — they grow the peppers, make the jelly, distribute it. I love the stuff!”

The two sides of the business bring very different customers to Farmhouse 208. The equine customers are often destination buyers — they come from places like Rexburg and Idaho Falls to buy specific items, while the gift store customers tend to be tourists or Teton Valley residents in search of home décor and accessories.

While Kate knows that opening a business right before the onset of the pandemic may have slowed her initial trajectory, she looks to the future with entrepreneurial enthusiasm. “I want people to come here and have a great experience. What about a food truck in the backyard? Lawn games? A pop-up farm-to-table dinner? What about a farm stand to complement the weekly farmers market?”