Teton Valley

Steve Horn spends his days crafting exquisite tables and designing one-of-a-kind headboards. His artistry is unmistakable. But the man behind the designs doesn’t call himself an artist. He smiles and says, “I just make a lot of dust.”

Albeit humble, Steve has spent the majority of his life honing his craft. Whether he’s bringing the character of a piece of wood to life as a bench etched with a silhouette of the Tetons, or turning a slab of stone into a beautiful sculpture of a Texas Ranger, his hard work has paid off.

What began as a simple love of whittling wood and creating has led to a gallery in Tetonia, Idaho, along with plans to open a second space in Fredericksburg, Texas. He has a fervent customer base that seeks out his work; pieces of his furniture are in homes in all 50 states and 10 countries.

“I just like to create,” he says. “I enjoy making furniture, but I also love creating a stone sculpture or wall art.”

Steve credits his wife of 22 years, Nora, for giving him the inspiration to design furniture.

“When we got married, she saw all the different things I had made that were inside the house and said she wanted me to make her furniture for her
office,” he recalls. “I told her I didn’t know how, but I’d learn.”

Eighteen years ago, the pair started Horn Mountain Living, a 4,000-square-foot space where visitors can peruse one-of-a-kind furnishings and take home whatever handmade relics, rustic antiques, or Western-style décor strikes their fancy.

Their Tetonia shop is a delight to explore, with walls lined with artwork and an array of Steve’s pieces displayed throughout. On certain days, you might even be lucky enough to catch him at the gallery and hear about his work.

“The shop offers the unique, original, and handmade,” Nora says. “Steve builds everything by hand, from milling a majority of his own wood to
the design.”

The breadth of his style, known for its rustic elegance, continues to develop. He has expanded to iron and stonework, as well as fashioning plaster
artwork to adorn walls.

The Horns spend a majority of their time in the Tetons, but for part of each winter, they head to central Texas. The quiet pace of the small mountain town in Idaho and the rolling hills of central Texas provide a welcome space to dream up his next idea.

“I am always just creating out of my head, whether it’s wood, stone, or whatever,” he explains. “I love doing custom work, but I most enjoy just thinking up an idea and creating.”

And create, he does—whether he calls himself an artist or a dust-maker.